Changing Landscapes, Shifting Tides

The Story of Falmouth Special Event Series
Event Series Flier

Exploring the interactions between humans and the landscape over Falmouth’s 300 year history.

Richard BlancoInaugural Event--The Power Of Place

Featuring Richard Blanco, inaugural poet and author.

Talk, Reading & Book Signing
January 16, 6:30pm

Note: The event has sold out.  A waiting list has been established.

Falmouth High School Theater, Woodville Road, Falmouth
Free, Reservations Required Click Here to Join Wait List

One of the most beloved and influential poets and storytellers writing today, Richard Blanc is driven by a desire to examine the essence of place and belonging.  His work explores the age-old questions:  Where am I from? Where do I belong? Who am I in this world?

Photo Credit Timothy Greenfield-Sanders

Special Partner Event:  Film Screening--Community Conservation:  Finding the Balance Between Nature and CulturePresumpscot River
January 11, 7-9pm

This documentary, shot throughout four seasons, profiles four active land trusts in different regions of Maine, demonstrating their efforts toward conservation for all members of their community.  Join award-winning Maine filmmaker Mark Ireland and the directors of local landtrusts to discuss the community conservation movement in Southern Maine.  FREE.   Click here to register.


Hosted by Falmouth Land Trust and partners
Episcopal Church of St. Mary’s, Foreside Road, Falmouth 

The Changing Nature of Maine's WoodsCover art for book Changing Nature of Maine's Wods

February 15, 7:00-8:30pm

Maine Audubon Members: $12, Nonmembers: $15  Register Here

Dr. Andrew Barton is a forest ecologist, science writer, and long-time faculty member at UMF.  His talk will focus on the forces affecting Maine’s forests and what people can do to conserve these critical ecosystems.  The talk will also discuss Maine Audubon’s “Forestry for Maine Birds” work educating foresters and landowners to manage for breeding birds and other critical ecological functions.

Hosted by Maine Auduon at Maine Audubon

Community Workshop--Lawns and Lobsters: Environmentally Safe Lawn Care

March 10, 9am-Noon

No registration required

This FREE workshop on environmentally safe lawn care will take place at the Portland Country Club. Everybody is welcome: homeowners, students, condo residents, retail businesses, and landscapers. Because all of Falmouth drains into Casco Bay, everything we put on our lawns affects lobsters, fish, and clams. Learn about this intricate relationship and the significant role yardscapers can play in preserving our natural resources.

Speakers include:

  • Jami Fitch from the Cumberland County Soil and Water Conservation District
  • Chip Osborne from Osborne Organics in Massachusetts
  • J. B. Christie from the Portland Country Club.

There will be displays by Skillins, Allen Sterling & Lothrop, Friends of Casco Bay, Maine Audubon, Falmouth Parks and Community Programs, and the Falmouth Schools. Refreshments will be served.

Hosted by Falmouth Conservation Commission, Portland Country Club, Foreside Road, Falmouth

Shaping the Maine Landscape: Wabanaki in Casco Bay

March 27 (Time TBD)

AbenakisJoin Bates College Professor Joseph Hall as he explores the question of how Wabanakis cultivated their ties to their homelands even as European-American colonists dispossessed them of most of that territory. Wabanakis, whose name translates as “the people of the Dawnland,” are the indigenous peoples of northern New England and eastern Canada. Their place names describe a particular set of relationships to Maine. Some names suggest how people moved over the land or—more likely—over the waters of Maine by describing the good portages and the dangerous rapids. Others mark good locations for gathering or growing food. Some of these names are still used today. Others have fallen out of use. All of them describe how Wabanakis made this place their home.

Hosted by Falmouth Memorial Library

Lunt Auditorium at Oceanview

Dr. Richard JuddDestination Falmouth: From Farmland to Vacationland

May 17 (Time and Location TBD)

Join Dr. Richard Judd, Professor of History at UMaine, who will explore the topic of coastal tourism in Maine. Falmouth, like many of Maine’s coastal communities, developed a reputation as an unspoiled scenic playground well-suited for vacationing.  The advent of the motor car, trolley, and rail system, coupled with an increase in leisure time resulted in a dramatic change to Falmouth’s Foreside community, the consequences of which still impact the town today.  

Hosted by Falmouth Historical Society

The Presumpscot River:  An Environmental History

July:  Date, Time, Location (TBD)

Michael Shaughnessy is an artist that has over 30 years has created installatioPresumpscot Riverns and exhibitions nationally. He is known for his large-scale sculptural works of woven and bound hay. For over twenty-five years Mr. Shaughnessy has taught sculpture design and drawing at the University of Southern Maine. He is currently the President of the Friends of the Presumpscot River and was one of it’s founders.  In this session, Shaughnessy will explore the history of the Presumpscot River, its importance to Falmouth's story, and the efforts underway to protect and conserve it.

Hosted by Falmouth Memorial Library


Robin KimmererNative Plants and Indigenous Wisdom

August 9 (Time TBD)

Robin Wall Kimmerer is a mother, scientist, decorated professor, and enrolled member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation. She is the author of Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledgeand the Teaching of Plants and Gathering Moss: A Natural and Cultural History of Mosses.

Additional details forthcoming.

Hosted by Maine Audubon at Maine Audubon

Additional Events to Be Added.  Check Back Regularly

A Falmouth300 collaboration in partnership with the Falmouth Conservation Commission, Falmouth Land
Trust, Falmouth Memorial Library, Falmouth Recycling and Energy Advisory Committee, Maine Audubon, and The Falmouth Historical Society.

Presented by Stantec Logo and partially funded by a grant from the Maine Humanities Council.